SA Dagger by Peter Lungstrass

SOLD!

A very nice, early (1933-35) SA Dagger by a seldom encountered maker, Peter Lungstrass. This is a true beauty! Very deep cherry colored grip, with scabbard to match. The wood of the grip is extremely smooth with very few imperfections (you have to look close to find them). The metal fittings are a bit loose, but there are absolutely no signs of the pommel nut ever having been removed so the loose fit is likely due to some minor shrinkage over time, and not from being messed with. The metal of the cross guards are near perfect, with no signs of oxidation or tarnishing at all. The Inspection Stamp “Wm” (Westmark) is clearly visible on the lower cross guard (on the same side as the maker mark)…

Out of stock

A very nice, early (1933-35) SA Dagger by a seldom encountered maker, Peter Lungstrass.

This is a true beauty! Very deep cherry colored grip, with scabbard to match. The wood of the grip is extremely smooth with very few imperfections (you have to look close to find them). The metal fittings are a bit loose, but there are absolutely no signs of the pommel nut ever having been removed so the loose fit is likely due to some minor shrinkage over time, and not from being messed with. The metal of the cross guards are near perfect, with no signs of oxidation or tarnishing at all. The Inspection Stamp “Wm” (Westmark) is clearly visible on the lower cross guard (on the same side as the maker mark).

The blade shows some very minor spotting, mainly along the blade’s edge. There is also a small cluster just south of the maker mark, which can be clearly seen in the photos. Otherwise this blade is a solid 95%. The maker mark is very crisp and clear, with the maker’s logo (an industrial lamp) and the words, “Peter Lungstrass Solingen Ohligs” surrounding it.

The scabbard shows the common corrosion roughness seen with these daggers. I personally like this look, but some prefer the more minty smooth look and feel. The corrosion about 95% of both sides of the scabbard, but the color is still as bold and rich as ever. The scabbard’s metal fittings are very nice, matching perfectly to the color of the cross guards. The lower tip cap is a bit loose, and the ball has sustained a slight dent (common with these daggers) but again there are no signs of it being messed with, likely just from age and use.

The unmarked hanger shows some wear, but should be expected from an early dagger that was likely worn quite often. The spring in the clip is still nice and strong, and the leather is solid.

An overall very nice SA Dagger from a rare maker with a very cool logo!

2 reviews for SA Dagger by Peter Lungstrass

  1. Darren

    Hi Dennis. Thanks for posting the message about your father’s SA dagger and Paratrooper (gravity) knife. These SA daggers are becoming more and more common, almost by the day! They used to be more rare, but since our WW2 heroes are passing away, and family members are uncovering their war souvenirs, these are quickly taking the place of the German army daggers as the most captured German war souvenir. I’ll email you privately regarding any questions or concerns you have about your father’s dagger and knife.

    Darren

  2. Dennis Conner

    Hi! I have a knife looking like this one from my Dad, a WWII veteran…he died a year ago and would like to know about its value. The appearance is the same on the blade and handle…on the back of the blade in a boxed area has an arrow pointing to “F.DICK”, on the hilt stamped: “Sw”. Also have a Nazi paratrooper knife, stainless with walnut handle, neither knife has ever been sharpened…original condition.

    Thanks for your assistance. Dennis

  3. Darren

    Hi Bill. Thanks for posting! I’m very sorry to hear about your relationship with your father. That’s unfortunate! As for the value of your father’s dagger, there are many factors that affect a dagger’s price; blade condition being a huge part of the value. Many daggers that people email me about have been stored inside their scabbard in a humid environment since the war and have developed rust/corrosion spots throughout the length of the blade. These daggers will be quite a bit less valuable (in general) than those with blades that are clean and shiny. Other value determination factors include; scabbard condition (dents, paint condition, rust, corrosion, etc), condition of the grip, condition of the metal fittings, and many more. I would really need to see photos of all of these areas in order to determine a true value.

  4. Wilbur

    Hi, My Father had a Knife like this dagger, from WW2, and I was wondering if you know how much they are worth. I am just curious about it, because My Father let my nephew sell it for him. My Father doesn’t really want to see me anymore, (that stinks too, sorry just wanted to say that to someone), but I just wanted to see if he got a fair deal. I don’t know how much he got for it, but I might be able to find out. This is a cool place, and there are not many sites like this one, lucky I found it. Thanks for reading my question, and thoughts, have a great evening, see ya. Bill.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. By browsing this website, you agree to our use of cookies.

Shopping cart

close